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Publications

05 March 2003

Muslim Europe or Euro-Islam: Politics, Culture, and Citizenship in the Age of Globalization
Edited by Nezar AlSayyad and Manuel Castells

Arhictecture and Planning Professor Nezar AlSayyad and Manuel Castells, professor of sociology and city and regional planning, are coeditors of a new book, “Muslim Europe or Euro-Muslim.”

“Five centuries after the expulsion of Muslims and Jews from Spain, Europe is once again becoming a land of Islam — albeit for a minority of the European population,” AlSayyad and Castells write in their introduction.

The work is a compilation of essays by scholars from Egypt, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and the United States. Originally presented at a 1998 campus conference, “Islam and the Changing Identity of Europe,” they were updated for the book.

“Muslim Europe” meets a growing demand for information about all aspects of Islam following the events of September 11, 2001, and projections that by the year 2050, Europe will be 20 percent Muslim.

AlSayyad chairs Berkeley’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies; Castells is the former chair of the Center for Western European Studies.

Lexington Books
216 pages


Reaching Higher: The Power of Expectations in Schooling
By Rhona S. Weinstein

In her new book, “Reaching Higher,” Professor of Psychology Rhona Weinstein investigates the power of expectations in schooling, illustrating how adults’ expectations can powerfully shape students’ performance and attitudes.

Distilling decades of research, including field work in schools, Weinstein gives voice to children, parents, teachers, principals, and university faculty, and shows how even young children learn how to “live down” to adult expectations, as well as “living up” to them.

“She’s against the widespread practice of grouping students by ability and then, inevitably, expecting more from the top groups and less from the others,” the New York Times wrote in a recent review. “[Weinstein] makes her case with an impressive array of data and case studies. “

Says Carola Suarez-Orozco of the Harvard Immigration Project: “‘Reaching Higher’ provides a crucial reexamination of the corrosive effects of low teacher expectancies — not in artificial experimental contexts, but in the complex ecology of students’ and teachers’ lives in the American school system.”

Harvard University Press
345 pages