"Well said!"

Quotes, statements, bon mots, and noteworthy utterances from the campus and beyond

12 November 2008

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“[One] concern I have about American attitudes toward race, should Obama get elected ... is [that] people will feel like, ‘We’re done with this issue — we’ve elevated a black man to the highest office and we’re done.’ Nothing could be further from the truth.” 

Goodwin Liu, professor of law., Nov. 3

“The turning point in this election didn’t happen on the campaign trail but rather on Wall Street. In the last week of September, the race was essentially tied. Then Wall Street collapsed — and it collapsed right on top of John McCain.”

Dan Schnur, lecturer of political science, in a Los Angeles Times opinion piece, Nov. 3

“It’s taken two wars and almost a depression to get people to overlook skin color and go for the qualified candidate....Obviously it’s a major milestone, but I’m not ready to [say] that race is dead in American politics.

Charles Henry, professor of African American Studies, on the election of Barack Obama. Toronto Globe & Mail, Nov. 5

“To see so many young people so happy, holding American flags, and finally showing some pride in their country is a refreshing sight at UC Berkeley. Yet ... this doesn’t change the fact that the youth have been indoctrinated to love a President just because of his image.”

Sophomore Danae Condos, in a blog posting on, Nov. 5.

“I absolutely know that Obama is ready for the challenge — intellectually and emotionally. Which I suppose means he’s just a little bit nuts.”

Chris Edley, dean of the School of Law, in a San Francisco Chronicle opinion piece, Nov. 9.

“I have never been more proud to be a University of California Berkeley student. I have never been more proud than to have the friends who gave up class for a night, gave up studying to join and just stand in the streets to rejoice. [Cars] rolled their windows down and gave us high-fives, honking in support as we stopped traffic, mid-street, even though the light had long ago turned green.”

Undergrad Brighton Lynscot Kimbell, in a Nov. 8 post on

“Liberals and conservatives are roughly equally closed-minded in dealing with dissonant real-world evidence.”

Philip Tetlock, professor of psychology, in an article comparing sense-of-humor measures applied to supporters of both presidential candidates.
New York Times, Nov. 4.

“At various times, the Republicans have made serious inroads into the Latino vote only to fall back by embracing harsh anti-immigrant policies.... Nativism in the GOP stoked by terrorism fears after 9/11 pushed Latinos back into the welcoming embrace of the Democratic Party in the last two elections.”

Bruce Cain, professor of political science, in a Los Angeles Times opinion piece, Nov. 6.