Berkeley in the News

Berkeley in the News is a daily selection of articles and commentaries in the news media that mention UC Berkeley. The views and opinions expressed in these articles do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of the campus.

Thursday, 25 August 2016

1. Berkeley in the News will take a break Friday, August 26, resuming publication on Monday, August 29.

2. U.S. parks mark centennial: How Bay Area helped create 'America's best idea'
San Francisco Chronicle (*requires registration)

It's the National Park Service's 100th birthday today, and this article notes: "The Bay Area, particularly UC Berkeley, was the incubator of what is now the Park Service and its army of rangers and naturalists." The organization's first director, Stephen Mather, and Franklin Lane, the Secretary of the Interior at the time, were Berkeley alumni, as was Horace Albright, Mather's chief assistant, who later took over the director of the Park Service after Mather became ill. Other Berkeley affiliates in key roles included Professor Adolph Miller, Professors Joseph Le Conte (father and son), and alum Mark Daniels.
Full Story

3. Climate Study: By 2085 All U.S. Cities Except San Francisco Will Be Too Hot to Host Summer Olympics
Democracy Now!

Climate change could make just three North American cities -- San Francisco, Calgary, and Vancouver (B.C.) -- temperate enough to host the Summer Olympics by 2085, a new study led by public health professor Kirk Smith suggests. He notes that the problem is not just high temperatures, but also higher humidity, which will make outdoor endurance events unhealthy. However, the Olympics is really only a metaphor for a more pressing issue -- that people will have a much harder time doing outdoor labor in the future. "So, of course, we're not really all that concerned about our most elite athletes," Professor Smith says. "They are very well conditioned. They are very well managed by the physicians on their teams. But it's the tip of the iceberg. The last line in our paper is: 'If we have to worry about our most elite athletes, what about the rest of us?' Because it is the rest of us that are most at risk from the rising heat and humidity." Link to video. Stories on this topic have appeared in dozens of sources around the world, including Reuters and AlterNet. For more on this, see our press release at Berkeley News.
Full Story

4. All Things Considered: Despite Lessons From 2009 Quake, Buildings In Italy Remain Vulnerable
NPR

Although earthquakes are common in central Italy, and building codes have been updated, the country's older buildings remain vulnerable. Architecture professor Mary Comerio, president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, visited L'Aquila soon after the 2009 earthquake there, and she's returned several times since. She says: "One of the difficult lessons -- and this is generally true in Italy -- is that there's a lot of delay in any kind of recovery because of the kind of arguments over what to do with the historic structures." L'Aquila, she says, has "just begun some rebuilding on really the furthermost outside streets of town, but the historic center is untouched. It's just empty and dead." She hopes villages struck by the latest earthquake will find a better solution. Link to audio.
Full Story

5. Reining in drug prices now up to voters with Prop. 61
San Francisco Chronicle (*requires registration)

Two California measures aimed at restraining drug prices have failed in the past year, and San Francisco State University health education professor Ramón Castellblanch, a visiting scholar at Berkeley's Labor Center, explains why public outrage doesn't translate into action. "The industry is extraordinarily powerful. They are extremely well financed, they give a lot of money to both sides (Republicans and Democrats) and they manage to have their way," he says. Another measure -- Proposition 61 -- is still in play, but Professor Castellblanch expects legal challenges to stall it. He also questions how much impact states can have when the federal government controls patent policies that help pharmaceutical companies keep monopolies on certain drugs. "There's a ton of price gouging going on. ... It's complicated ... but, still, there's a lot of room for the drug companies to cut their prices and profits and still make a buck."
Full Story

6. Economists Who've Advised Presidents Are No Fans of Donald Trump
Wall Street Journal (*requires registration)

In an election survey of all 45 surviving former members of the White House Council of Economic Advisers under the last eight presidents, not one responded to express support of Donald Trump's candidacy for president. Most of the Democrats expressed support for Hillary Clinton, and Berkeley economist Christina Romer, who chaired the council under President Obama, said: "I believe she is the most qualified candidate in terms of temperament, intelligence, leadership and policy prescriptions."
Full Story

7. Opinions: In today's troubling times, where are our faith leaders?
Washington Post

In a column about today's "increasingly secular" politics, history professor David Hollinger is quoted. "The absence of sustained, public scrutiny of religious ideas in our time," he said, "has created a vacuum filled with easy God talk."
Full Story

8. Capitol Alert
Sacramento Bee

Former Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez, now a UC regent, is transferring his official papers to UC Berkeley Thursday evening, and several legislators are expected to attend the event.
Full Story

9. Andronico's, UC Berkeley Partner for Latest FitBank Challenge
Progressive Grocer

Andronico's Community Markets is sponsoring a new round of their FitBank challenge, in which they award cash and healthful foods to participants who log daily exercise workouts at the gym of their choice. The new challenge, running Sept. 4-Oct. 1, will let participants donate their earned rewards to UC Berkeley's student pantry, which helps to feed students who have to skip meals to save money.
Full Story

10. On Parenting: Do you really have to go on college tours?
Washington Post (*requires registration)

Writing about the "weird ritual" of college tours, alumna Alina Tugend recalls her "pre-Internet" era, when she saw UC Berkeley for the first time just a few days before classes started. She thinks that if tours had been a big thing back then, a large public university probably wouldn't have made her list, but she says: "I loved my four years there." She concludes that touring colleges with her sons was a bonding experience. "And the tours did leave me wistful. More than the buildings or statistics, what sticks with me is how walking around these campuses, time seemed to split as I simultaneously relived my college past and imagined my child's future."
Full Story

11. Sydney rain forces changes in Cal, Hawaii training schedules
Washington Post (*requires registration)

As the Golden Bears football team prepared Wednesday for their untraditional season opener playing against Hawaii in Sydney, Australia, they had to contend with some unaccustomed weather as well. "We worked through it," Coach Sonny Dykes said. "We had a bit of rain, and bit of cold, not the best weather conditions. ... Anytime you travel 24 hours there are going to be some obstacles, but overall we've done a good job of adjusting." The weather forecast for the game is a 50 percent chance of light rain and a high temperature of 66 Fahrenheit. The game will be televised in California starting at 7 p.m. Friday.
Full Story

12. Bay Area fall art picks
San Francisco Chronicle (*requires registration)

"Mind Over Matter: Conceptual Art From the Collection," a new exhibit at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, is highlighted as a fall art event in the Bay Area. The show, which runs from Oct. 19 to Dec. 23, is curated by Connie Lewallen and unveils a new acquisition – the Steven Leiber collection. The new museum building includes space for a specialized conceptual art study center, and this critic says: "I am looking forward to a better understanding of the collection that prompted such an investment." For more information, visit BAMPFA.
Full Story

13. Bay Area fall arts picks: Classical music
San Francisco Chronicle (*requires registration)

Two Zellerbach Hall performances are highlighted as classical music picks for the fall. The first, Oct. 7-9, is a Cal Performances weekend residency of the Philharmonia Orchestra of London, with conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen. They will focus on the music of Stravinsky. Visit Cal Performances for more information. The second performance is the season opening of the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra, with music director Joana Carneiro, on Oct. 13. They will perform a commissioned world premiere by Paul Dresher, along with Korngold's Violin Concerto featuring soloist Philippe Quint. For more on that event, visit Berkeley Symphony.
Full Story

UC Berkeley in the News Archives

Subscribe to daily email of Berkeley in the News